Monday, February 25, 2013

Cloth Diapers for BEGINNERS

Recently we decided to make the switch from disposable diapers to cloth diapers, and I am so happy we did! There are so many benefits of cloth diapering (better for the baby, better for your wallet, better for the environment, etc.), and I've already noticed a huge difference with the cloth diapers. Before we made the switch (and one of the main reasons why I decided to make the switch) Jack was getting diaper rash frequently, and when I looked it up I found that one of the reasons disposables can create diaper rash is because of, among many things, the chemicals used in the diapers. Seriously, chemicals in the freakin diaper?! So, how did I even begin thinking of cloth diapers in the first place? I gotta be honest and tell you that part of the reason was because I stumbled upon this blog, and because she talked so highly of cloth diapers in almost every post of hers, it got me thinking. And when I got to thinking, I got to researching. One thing led to another, and after a little research I was convinced that we needed to switch. Like I said earlier, diaper rash was our main reason for switching, but after learning that cloth diapers can save an average of $3,000.00 per child (if cloth is used from start to finish), I was extremely motivated to start SAVING money. After following the process I talk about below, I figured out how much we spend on disposables per month, and how much it would cost to get everything we need for the cloth diaper journey, and then from there figured out how many months it would take to pay for the cloth diapers. What I mean by this is that even though we would have to pay for all of the stuff for cloth diapering up front, it would take only eight months of buying disposable diapers to pay for all of the cloth diaper stuff. And considering that I have anywhere from a year to a year and a half (or possibly even two years) left in diapers with Jack, I decided the up-front cost of cloth was more than worth it in the long run. Now here's the fun part... Because the whole cloth diaper thing can be slightly VERY overwhelming, I thought I would break it down into steps... This will be long winded, but I will try to keep it simple. I promise! :)

Where to start: First off, start by learning the cloth diaper terminology. Some of the phrases used for cloth diapering can seem confusing if you don't know what they mean. This website provides a whole list of terms and is a good place to start learning what different terms means. Next, talk to people you know who use cloth diapers. Trust your peers when they either recommend or don't recommend something, and make sure you know WHY they do or don't recommend it. As with everything baby related, what works for one may not work for another, but moms always have a good reason why they do or don't like something. Because I don't actually know anyone in person who uses cloth diapers, I decided to contact Laura about her experience with them. In her blog post she mentioned a few brands that she uses and loves, with pros and cons of each diaper.

Step 1: Pick the type(s) of diaper you want to use. Now here is where it can become overwhelming. Not only are there several brands, but there are also different types of cloth diapers. I'll give you three types that I know the most (or at least a little bit) about:
  • Prefolds: These are what you think of when you think of cloth diapering in the 50s. It's the rectangular piece of cloth that you fold according to the size and shape of your baby. With a prefold you need a waterproof diaper cover, and either pins or "snappis." From what I've learned, these are great if you want to use cloth diapers from the first time you put a diaper on your baby because they are easiest to size (and then by the time they are roughly 10 pounds you can switch to a pocket or AIO if you so choose). These are also the cheapest option available.
  • Pockets: A pocket diaper is a diaper that has an outer shell made of polyurethane liner (PUL), which is waterproof, a micro fleece liner on the inside (which actually goes right up to your baby's skin), and then has the cotton inserts that you stuff into the diaper. With each brand the pocket is going to vary a bit. Some brands have the pocket opening in the front, and some in the back. The micro fleece is not really waterproof but it is water resistant, so it deters moisture (aka urine) away from the body and towards the cotton insert. This is not the most affordable option, but it is very popular because of the comfort and convenience.

  • All-In-Ones (AIOs): I can't provide a ton of information on AIOs as far as the differences between brands, I can only provide info about what I know about the AOIs for Bumgenius. When I first narrowed down my brand, I had decided I wanted all AIOs, then after considering the cost we decided to go with pockets because the BumGenius AIOs were $2.00 more than the BumGenius pockets, and that can really start to add up when buying diapers in bulk. The AIOs are similar to the  pockets in the sense that they have the same outer shell. But instead of having a micro fleece lining, and a pocket that you put the cotton inserts into, the "inserts" are attached to the shell. There's two cotton pieces, one sewn to the front, and one sewn to the back and they overlap. These go right up to the baby's skin. These are probably the most convenient diaper, but as previously stated, more expensive than the pockets.

  • Other: Other types of diapers to look into are flats, fitted, and All-In-Twos. I did not research these very much and did not look at any of these in person, so I can't provide any info about them.
  • Fastening the diaper- Hook and Loop vs. Snaps: Hook and Loops means velcro, which is very similar to the way a disposable diaper is secured. Then there's snaps, our BumGenius diapers have 10 snaps across the front to allow you to secure the diaper as loose or as tight as you want. Our BumGenius diapers also have a 3X3 "Snap Down" system which is how you adjust the diaper size according to baby's age/size. For a 10 pound (approximately two month old) baby you want your diaper to be on the smallest snap. Then as your baby grows you move down a snap, until eventually you don't snap the diaper down at all. Jack is seven months old, and at his six month check up he was 18 pounds, so we don't snap down the diapers at all.
 

Step 2: Pick a few brands and research them. If you can, read consumer reviews. Even try to find other blogs about cloth diapering... Just keep in mind that some people (but not all) get paid for blogging and get incentives for saying they use a certain product/brand and like them. I searched cloth diapers on Pinterest and found a few different links to blogs. From there, I picked a few brands that I wanted to learn more about. The brands that I ended up looking into were BumGenius, Thirsties, and Charlie Banana. By researching these brands, I found a local store here in town that sells cloth diapers and decided to go check them out in person. From there, I ruled out Charlie Banana for the simple fact that the store did not carry that brand... I wanted to go with a diaper that I had experience playing with. I also ended up ruling out Thirsties too, just because I ended up looking at the BumGenuis brand first and fell with them so I gave little attention to Thirsties. My smartest move? Maybe, maybe not... I guess I'll never know since I decided to pick one brand and buy ALL of my diapers in that single brand. Some moms choose to buy a few different brands and experiment with them so they can find the one they truly love. Another thing to note, since each brand is going to vary a bit, and since each baby is different, some brands are going to work better for specific situations while another brand will work better for other specific situations (such as night time vs. play time, etc). But this ultimately just comes down to personal choice. Like I said, I bought all of my diapers in one brand (BumGenius) with the mindset that I was going to make that one diaper work for all occasions.
Step 3: Figure out how many diapers you will need. This comes down to how often you want to do laundry and how old your baby is, as well as how many kids you have in diapers. We have one kid in diapers, and I didn't want to do laundry every day. Our local store provided a chart (below) which I used to kind of help determine how many we would buy. Ultimately we ended up buying 24 diapers, which was more than recommended for Jack's age and how often I wanted to do laundry, but we did this for two reasons. One, we're planning on having more kids in the future and we will cloth diaper them. The bigger the stash, the more you rotate diapers, the more you rotate diapers the less wear and tear occurs. This basically means the more diapers we have for Jack, the better the chance of them still being in good enough shape to use with our next child. And two, our local store offered an incentive for buying 24 diapers. When you buy 24 diapers, not only do you get a discount for buying in bulk, you also receive a free diaper sprayer.

 

Step 4: This is the "everything else" step. You need to figure out what else you need to make cloth diapering work.
  1. Diaper pail and Diaper pail Liner: You need to have a specific place to put dirty diapers until you wash them. You want to make sure you pick something that is ventilated to help with the smell of dirty diapers. A large kitchen trash can with swinging lid works great, or even a large hamper. We're using a large hamper that has "air holes" all over the lid. You will also want to consider a diaper pail liner. This is pretty much a laundry bag that is water proof. It helps to keep your pail from getting messy. The diaper pail liner can usually be thrown in and washed with the diapers, but should not be dried in the dryer. If it has elastic around the top it should not be dried in the dryer to prevent the elastic from relaxing and most diaper pail liners have Polyurethane lining (PUL) which will delaminate under high temperatures. We ended up with two pail liners to rotate them. I always have one clean one that can be used while the other is in the wash.
  2. Wet Bag or Wet-Dry Bag: A wet bag, or a wet-dry bag is for your diaper bag. This is like a diaper pail liner, but much smaller. They have either a zip top, or a draw string top. You want to have one of these in your diaper bag for when you're out and about because it keeps wet/dirty diapers contained and keeps them from contaminating everything else in your diaper bag. These can also be thrown in the wash with your diapers. Like the pail liners, I also have two wet bags to rotate them and always have a clean one in the diaper bag.
  3. Laundry Detergent: We originally started by using a cloth diaper safe detergent because that is what is recommended by most major cloth diaper manufacturers but I quickly learned that cloth diaper safe detergent is not necessary. Many people have success with the "safe" detergents, but I realized that there was something in that detergent that my son was sensitive to. We now use powdered Tide Free & Gentle detergent and don't have any issues with this. The thing to keep in mind with detergent is to check with your brand to see what will void the warranty on your diapers (if there is a warranty). BumGenius states that if you use anything other a "safe" detergent it will void your warranty, but for me I'd rather use a detergent that my son doesn't have a reaction to that honestly works just as well, if not better than a "regular" detergent.
  4. Inserts: There are different types of inserts available for pockets, such as hemp, bamboo, and even flour sack towels. These types of inserts are more absorbent, which makes it a great thing to use at night when your baby can go up to 12 hours without a diaper change. We bought two packs of two hemp inserts (so four hemp inserts total) to use at night. If I do laundry every other day, four was all I needed.
  5. Disposable Liners: While this kind of defeats the purpose of cloth if used regularly, they are a great option for when you're leaving your baby with a baby sitter or when you're traveling. A disposable liner is a piece of biodegradable tissue that you place in the bottom of the diaper (touching the baby's skin; you don't put it inside the pocket), then when baby poops you can either throw it away or flush it. This is great because it helps cut down on the mess for someone who is less familiar or uncomfortable with cloth, and it's great for traveling because you don't have to worry about rinsing your poopy diapers off before throwing them in the wet bag. Another plus of disposable liners is that you can use any kind of diaper rash cream with the disposable liner. Typically you don't need a diaper rash cream with cloth because a rash should not occur, but if you do, using a disposable liner allows you to use any brand of cream, where as if you don't use the liner you MUST use a cloth safe diaper rash cream so it does not cause build up in the diapers. Silk liners are also an option for fighting diaper rash if it does occur in cloth. Silk is super soft and super gentle on skin and can help sooth the rash.
  6. Diaper Sprayer: This is like one of those shower heads that has the hose and can be hand held. It connects to your toilet and is used to spray off the poop so you don't have to get your hands dirty. As mentioned above, our local diaper store offered a free diaper sprayer with the purchase of 24+ diapers.
Step 5: Learning how to care for your cloth diapers. Once you learn this, it becomes a routine, and is not as hard as it seems. To start with the nitty gritty details; there are three different phases of poop. There's the first stage which is the poop that does not have food in it (before your baby starts solids). If you're baby has strictly breast milk and no formula, then the poop is water soluble and can be thrown into the washer without rinsing first. If your baby is formula fed, or a combination of formula and breast milk, then the diaper needs to be rinsed before being washed in the washer (it's recommended that you rinse before throwing into the diaper pail so it comes off easier and doesn't start to smell). Then there's the second stage, which has food in it because your baby has started solids (like cereal and puree, or even chunks of actual food). This is the poop that is loose and squishy, not solid (told you it was nitty gritty). This also needs to be rinsed before being washed in the washer (and before being thrown in the diaper pail). Then there's the third stage, which is the solid poop that can be "plopped" into the toilet by simply turning the diaper over. It should come off easy with little work. Now, here's the wash routine that our local store recommended:
  1. Start by rinsing your diapers in cold water. This gets all the rest of the poop residue off and into the sewer. Do not use detergent in this step.
  2. Next, wash diapers on HOT (turn your water heater up if need be) with recommended amount of detergent. Our local store recommended two to three tablespoons per load (and make sure you're actually measuring, no guessing!).
  3. Follow the hot wash with at least two COLD rinses and NO detergent. You want to make sure that there is no smell of detergent left because detergent smell means there is still detergent in the diapers, and detergent means build up. Follow with a third cold rinse if need be. In all the washing steps, you want to be sure you're using enough water to fully cover every diaper, but not too much that the diapers won't agitate against each other.
  4. Inserts can be dried in the dryer, but the shells and anything that has elastic and/or PUL in them should be air dried to prevent the elastic from relaxing and the PUL from delaminating.
***Please see our updated wash routine HERE
 

Ok, wow, I told you it would be long winded! Hopefully I kept it simple and easy to understand though. Like I said earlier, I know that the whole cloth diaper thing can seem really overwhelming, but if you really think it's something you want to do, it's not as hard to wrap your mind around everything and really begin to understand it all. To end this post, I want to break down cost a little more. We bought 24 BumGenius pocket diapers at $16.99 a piece (they are originally $17.99, but BumGenius offers a $1.00 off discount when you buy 12 or more diapers) PLUS the free diaper sprayer (which is valued at $50.00) that was offered by the store with the purchase of 24+ diapers. Then we also bought one diaper pail liner (it's a Planet Wise pail liner, $16.99), one wet bag (also Planet Wise, $16.99), one bag of Rockin Green Detergent ($16.99), two packs of hemp inserts ($7.99 per pack), two silk liners ($2.99 each), and one roll of Bummis Bio Soft disposable liners ($7.99 per roll). After tax we spent a total of $522.70, PLUS our local store has this cool thing they do which is kind of like a punch card system. What they do is they give a card with six boxes on it, each time you make a purchase they write the total of the purchase in a box. Once you reach six filled up boxes, they add up the total of each box and then give you 10 percent of that total back in in-store credit. Because I knew this before I started purchasing everything we would need, I purchased things separately to get my in-store credit immediately. The reason I did this was because I knew I would want two pail liners, two wet bags, and extra detergent, and I wanted it all instantly. I was really trying to make the most of my money. I used my in-store credit to get the second wet bag, second diaper pail liner, and the extra bag of detergent. So, for $522.70 I got 24 pocket diapers, a diaper sprayer, two diaper pail liners, two wet bags, two bags of detergent, four hemp inserts, two silk liners, and a roll of biodegradable disposable liners... And the cool thing is, that's approximately the same amount of money we would spend on disposable diapers in eight months, leaving somewhere between 3-9 months of diapering that will be practically free, plus the future use of cloth diapers with future kids.

 

Please feel free to email me with any further questions, I'd be happy to try to break it down even further if something in this post did not make sense. Also, if you want the name and phone number/website of my local store, you can find that under the cloth diaper info tab at the top of the page. They do ship things, and as far as I understand (although I may be incorrect), they do honor the punch card system thing online and/or over the phone, just be sure to check with the owner first.

**Disclaimer: I am not a cloth diaper expert. Anything stated in this post is what I have learned from personal experience, or what I have been told by the local cloth diaper store owner. This means that some of the information I provided could be wrong. If you choose to follow my advice, I cannot be held accountable for any mishap that may occur while using cloth diapers or other products in combination with cloth diapers. Do your research and use at your own discretion.

13 comments:

  1. Well written blog with good description on diaper bags

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  2. First time parents need all the help and information they can get when it comes to taking care of their baby properly. And when it comes to cloth diapers, this article provided essentials. Thanks a lot for the tips.

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  3. Great post! Could you post the name of the store and its website on the blog or in the comments?

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    1. It's www.babycottonbottoms.com . I hope the owner is still honoring her points/rewards system for over the phone and online orders :) good luck!

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  4. This was an awesome breakdown on cloth diapering! We will be taking the plunge after my hub's next paycheck and this definitely helped me make up my mind on a couple of things! Thanks so much!

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    1. Thanks for the feedback! Good luck with your cloth diapering journey! I hope it's just as great for you as it's been for us :)

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  5. I don't have a baby, but some day if I do, I will totally refer to this! I have always been curious about one aspect of cloth diapers. What happens when the baby has a blow-out? Are there ever diapers that you have to give up trying to clean and throw out?

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    1. Oops my reply posted as its own comment below yours. :/

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  6. Thanks, that's so great to hear that this post could be helpful to you someday! :) To be honest, we haven't had one single blow out in the 6+ months of using cloth diapers, and it seems like when we were using disposables that we were having a blow like every other week. That's supposed to be one of the great advantages of cloth diapers. They're made to be sturdier, more absorbent and in my opinion they mold better to the baby's body to help contain the mess better. So, to try to best answer your question, I haven't had to worry about giving up and throwing away any diapers (yet).

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  7. This is a great write-up! I just started CDing about a month ago, I wish I'd found this before I started!
    It is so overwhelming to start from scratch, not knowing anything about CDing! I used disposables on my first two children, and on my third until he was a year old (last month). Baby #4 is due any day (actually, my due date was yesterday), and I just knew I couldn't afford disposables for two babies at the same time. I have done a lot of research and bargain-hunting, and so far we're doing prefolds and covers (a friend is helping me make my stash of covers), and I have purchased some pockets from various cheap online stores. We have spent the last three-four months slowly buying a little at a time before we could really throw ourselves into it full time, and that was probably the hardest for me - waiting for stuff to get here, having a few things but not all of them - waiting is not my strong suit! ;-)
    This was a really helpful post about cloth diapering! I even learned somethings I hadn't read elsewhere! Thanks!

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    1. Thank you so much for the feedback Jennifer! Please be sure to check back in a month or so for a cloth diaper series I'll be doing after one full of CDing. I hope you're enjoying the journey so far!

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